Remote shut down with Windows Server Advanced Power Management and MagicPacket

This article describes how to implement remote shut down with Windows Server Advanced Power Management and MagicPacket.

Step 1: Windows Server Advanced Power Management

Windows Server Advanced Power Management Logo

The first step is installing Windows Server Advanced Power Management (hereafter called WSAPM) on the PC which should be shut down, restarted or sent to standby or hibernate mode remotely.

WSAPM is a program for advanced power management on Windows computers. Primarily made for home servers, it is also useful for desktop PCs. This article only describes the functionalities needed for remote shut down. But WSAPM offers a lot more features, which are all described in detail in the user manual.

After the installation of the program, call the program settings and select the tab called Remote shut down.

Windows Server Advanced Power Management: Settings - Remote shut down
Windows Server Advanced Power Management: Settings – Remote shut down
  • Enable remote shut down: Activate this option to enable remote shut down.
  • Port (UDP) for remote shut down: Specify a UDP port which is used for receiving remote shut down commands (default: port 9).
  • Password (optional): Optionally you can specify a password. The remote shut down commands are only executed when the password (sent with the command) was correct. If you do not want to use a password, just leave the text boxes blank.
    Important: As the password is send unencrypted over the network, this is not to be meant a real security feature. Please do not use any important passwords which you already use for other services or logins.

After applying the settings, the status panel for remote shut down will indicate that remote shut down is active. You can close the program now.

Now a Windows service is running in the background listening for incoming remote shut down commands on the UDP port specified. This service is always started when the system is started.

Step 2: MagicPacket

MagicPacket Logo

MagicPacket is an app for Wake On LAN (available for Windows and Windows Phone) which can also send remote shut down commands. The screenshots are taken from the Windows Phone version of the app.

To enable remote shut down, the option for remote shut down has to be enabled in the app’s settings.

MagicPacket: Remote shut down in the app's settings
MagicPacket: Remote shut down in the app’s settings

In the properties for a computer, you can find more options for remote shut down:

MagicPacket: Remote shut down properties of a computer
MagicPacket: Remote shut down properties of a computer
  • Port (Wake On WAN/remote shut down): Specifies the UDP port used for sending remote shut down commands (and also Wake On WAN commands). This has to be the same port as specified in WSAPM.
  • Password (remote shut down): The password also has to be the same as specified in WSAPM. If no password should be used, just leave this blank.

Now you can remotely shut down or restart the computer or send it to standby or hibernate mode

  • by the context menu of a computer/group.
  • by NFC: you can write NFC tags for Wake On LAN as well as for remote shut down
  • by voice command (Cortana – Windows Phone only): a complete list of all available voice commands is listed in the app’s help screen.
MagicPacket: Remote shut down by context menu
MagicPacket: Remote shut down by context menu

FAQ

Why do I need a program installed for remote shut down?

There is no standard defined for remote shut down. When it comes to Wake On LAN, there is a standard, which is often implemented in hardware. That is why Wake On LAN is working without any additional software.
Because such a standard is missing with remote shut down, you need a program receiving remote shut down commands and processing these.

Remote shut down does not work

Remote shut down is implemented as communication between a server (computer which should be shut down remotely) and a client (sending the remote shut down commands). The communication uses UDP in this case. On the server side, a possibly installed firewall must not block incoming UDP traffic.
During setup of Windows Server Advanced Power Management, am exception is applied to the Windows firewall. If a third party firewall is installed on the machine, this exception has to be applied manually for this firewall.

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